JOIN US 

  • 003-facebook
  • 001-telegram
  • 002-whatsapp
ezgif.com-gif-maker.gif
  • Yakub Ansari

Flooded battery | What is it?

Updated: May 7

Batteries are one of the most essential discoveries in human history, they enable us to carry the stored power and keep us in light even when the whole power grid failed. However, it is also one of the most complicated technology and even with more than 160 years of its presence. Still, most of the general people didn’t understand that much.


The flooded lead-acid battery is invented in 1859, was the first rechargeable battery and after decades of refinement, it remains the primary choice for many applications.


Here in this blog, I cover most of the fundamentals of flooded batteries.


What is a Flooded battery?


A flooded battery is one of the types of rechargeable lead-acid batteries. It is based on the most basic and earlier designs of batteries. It has two electrodes [positive and negative] immersed in a liquid form electrolyte, which is fundamentally a solution of sulfuric acid and the cells are open for topping up with water for replenishment of electrolyte. However, its electrodes could be either flat plate type or tubular type.


The following reaction occurs in the lead-acid battery during charging and discharging:


Charged Battery

(+ve) PbO2 + (-ve) Pb + (electrolyte) 2H2SO4


Discharged Battery

(+ve) PbSO4 + (-ve) PbSO4 + (water) 2H2O


Electrodes in Flooded battery.

Fundamentally, there are two types of electrodes used in flooded batteries, that is flat plate type and tubular type. Flat-plate electrodes are the most common type of electrodes used in lead-acid batteries. Flat plate electrodes are mode by mesh grid structure of the lead alloy pasted with sponge-like lead oxide paste and pressed to form a flat plate type structure.



However, tubular electrodes are made of a frame structure consisting of a series of vertical spines connected to a common bus bar. Each spine is covered by non-conductive tubes filled with a paste of lead oxide active mass.